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Wednesday, November 26, 2014

technology

Tokyo software company expands to Oxford

Axsh Co. LTD., a Japanese software technology company specializing in distributed computing solutions, announced Monday afternoon the expansion of its company to the United States with Axsh North America Inc., coming to Oxford. Michael Sullivan, CEO of Axsh North America, and Yasuhiro Yamazaki, CEO of Axsh Co. LTD., and chairman of the board for Axsh North America, presented the idea behind the new business at the University of Mississippi’s Small Business Development Center. (June 7, 2011, Page 1)

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    Critical thinking skills? Don’t make app for that

    Some of the basics and fundamentals of education – think teaching cursive writing – are going by the wayside in many schools. The cause? Technology. Local columnist Deidra Jackson worries about the trend and how it may eventually affect critical thinking by our youngsters in the education process. (March 24, 2011, Page 4)

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      Few signs of the future we were promised

      Remember the cartoon series, “The Jetsons,” that told us about the “future” with robots and flying cars and such? Word that a company in Massachusetts is coming out with a flying car brought memories of those promises from “The Jetsons” back to News Editor Jonathan Scott who takes a look at some other things we once thought we might have by now. (September 17, 2010, Page 4A)

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        Tech Board changes ahead?

        Lafayette and Oxford School Boards will soon approve or deny a proposal to give more power to the Lafayette County Schools Superintendent for the School of Applied Technology. The Lafayette Schools already have financial control over the jointly-run school. (September 1, 2010, Page 1)

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          LMS receives new technology

          Some 240 students at Lafayette Middle School are getting to use special clickers to answer questions in class, while teachers are using wireless notepads to see whether students are getting the answers right. The new devices are part of a $4,000 grant from the Lafayette Endowment for Education. (January 19, 2010, Page 7)

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