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Thursday, October 23, 2014

pseudoephedrine

Meth law cuts case load

A year-old law requiring cold medicines containing pseudoephedrine to be dispensed only by a doctor’s prescription is helping law enforcement battle methamphetamine. (July 11, 2011, Page 1)

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    No pseudoephedrine a non-issue for most

    With cold and flu season making its arrival, some local doctors are requiring patients to come into the office when they have a cold or flu and want decongestant medications containing pseudoephedrine, while others make a judgment call after talking to the patient over the phone as to whether they should come into the office.

    As of July 1, any pseudoephedrine-based cold medicines including — Sudafed, Tylenol Sinus Severe Cold and Zyrtec D — now require a prescription from a physician in Mississippi. The state law was passed during the 2010 legislative session and it’s aimed at fighting the state’s growing methamphetamine problem. Pseudoephedrine is an ingredient in cold and sinus medicines, which are often sold without a prescription. It is also the key ingredient used in the manufacture of methamphetamine. (October 25, 2010, Page 1)

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      New laws take effect today

      A new law, aimed at fighting the state’s growing methamphetamine problem, has made any medications containing pseudoephedrine no longer available over-the-counter. A doctor’s prescription is now required to purchase common cold and allergy medications that include Advil Cold and Sinus, Aleve D, Claritin D, Mucinex D, Nyquil D, Sudafed, Tylenol Sinus Severe Cold and Zyrtec D. (July 1, 2010, Page 1A)

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