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Monday, September 1, 2014

Education

Letters to the Editor

Maralyn Howell Bullion writes to remind people it’s Constitution Week and to encourage them to read the powerful document, while Katherin Carothers writes to thank Dr. Jean Shaw for her individual and collective contributions to the community. (September 19, 2011, Page 4A)

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    Taking small, but tasty, steps to adulthood

    One of the steps to adulthood involves learning to prepare food for meals. News Editor Jonathan Scott and his family are working with his elder daughter to help her make the transition to cooking her own meals and filling out her own menu – while she’s miles away at college. (September 1, 2011, Page 4)

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      Taking a look at ‘beautiful,’ ‘ugly’ words

      Did you know there are “beautiful” words, words that sound nice and leave us smiling? Just as there are “ugly” words, words that don’t sound nice and might make you cringe. Editor Don Whitten looks closer at an annual survey by Mississippi State professor Robert E. Wolverton Sr. that lists words in both categories. (August 19, 2011, Page 4A)

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        Some classes we like; others, well …

        A previous column discussed classes, periods and subjects that most students seem to like. What about the other side – the ones that many students aren’t as excited about. Editor Don Whitten takes a look at two Top 10 lists, one of the hardest subjects and the other of the most boring subjects. (August 17, 2011, Page 4)

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          Scores up in state, future promising

          With school back in session, Mississippi Department of Education board chairman Charles McClelland writes a guest column to note the improvement in test scores from last year and to say that even better things are expected this year in Mississippi. (August 8, 2011, Page 4)

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            It’s not just the heat, it’s the apprehension

            Is, as T.S. Eliot wrote, April the cruelest month. News Editor Jonathan Scott suggests it might actually be August because of all involved with starting school again. He takes a look at the concerns that parents have to help their children from pre-K through seniors in high school deal with this month every year. (August 4, 2011, Page 4)

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              School days can combine fun, education

              With open houses this week and classes beginning Thursday for most local students, Don Whitten takes a look at the “fun” parts of school – recess, lunch and activity period – and how they play a key role in the education process. (August 3, 2011, Page 4)

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                Lots of ‘summer reading’ going on these days

                Notice more folks around the book stores and library? How about fewer youngsters outside? Many of them, Editor Don Whitten suspects, are working on summer reading lists and projects as the days count down until the beginning of school. (July 27, 2011, Page 4A)

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                  Rounding up the ‘important’ school supplies

                  Have you filled the school supply list for your student? After seeing lists in several places, Editor Don Whitten recalled the way lists were made during his days as a student. The most important items back then, he writes, were satchels, notebooks and, most of all, Crayola crayons. (July 22, 2011, Page 4A)

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                    Green-uns

                    There are all kinds of ways to learn valuable lessons, and local columnist Jimmy Reed writes about one as he revisits memories of pilfering green, juicy plums from trees in the yard of one of his teachers at school. (July 12, 2011, Page 4)

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