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Thursday, November 27, 2014

Cell phones

Information thieves present new problem

Most of us have heard about phishing – using email messages to “fish” for personal information that could lead to identity theft. What about “smishing,” the newest electronic slight of hand? Editor Don Whitten warns readers about getting smished through text messages. (May 23, 2012, Page 4A)

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    Peace and quiet

    Local columnist T.J. Ray, who spent four decades teaching English, looks at changes in language over the years as well as the amount of noise that enters into our lives, probably without us realizing it. (October 18, 2011, Page 4)

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      What all can you do with your cell phone?

      Cell phones were created, obviously, to allow us to make wireless phone calls outside of the home or office. But what else can you do with a cell phone. Editor Don Whitten takes a closer look at some normal uses and some that might be a bit surprising to many. (September 8, 2011, Page 4)

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        Traffic concerns mount with return of students

        Did you get caught in that massive traffic jam on Jackson Avenue last Friday? What about today? How’s it coming dodging folks who are paying as much, or more, attention to their cell phones than the road? Editor Don Whitten takes a look at the last couple of weeks as the community adjusts to the addition of thousands of students and cars. (August 26, 2011, Page 4A)

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          Balancing connected with being too connected

          We live in a world of instant communication, and advanced and multipurpose cell phones are one of the tools that’s made that happen. Staff writer Alyssa Schnugg has recently updated her phone, but it still leaves her wondering if we might not be getting too connected these days. (February 4, 2011, Page 4A)

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            Tracking down those cell phone numbers

            Did you get one of those yellowbooks thrown in your driveway recently? Did you look inside to see if your name was there along with your phone number and address. If you weren’t there, it could be because you’re a part of that growing segment of the population with cell phones and no land lines. Editor Don Whitten relates some of the problems that not having everyone’s name, number and address handy creates. (August 9, 2010, Page 4)

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              Curtailing cell phone use in vehicles

              Retired professor T.J. Ray wonders if we might get a better hold on the problem with talking and texting while driving if we put notices in government vehicles warning the drivers they could lose their jobs if caught. (January 20, 2010, Page 4)

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