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Saturday, July 26, 2014

Mississippi River

Hooray — Hennie’s Home!

Local columnist Jimmy Reed reminds us of the value of our animals and pets as he recalls the story of lost Rhode Island Red chicken named Hennie. (June 24, 2014, Page 4)

The Chickasaw Nation slowly brought into the white man’s world

Columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield writes about the Chickasaw Nation and how the entire culture underwent a tremendous change when the white man arrived. (March 29, 2013, Page 3B)

Kayak trip benefits nonprofits

Three men braved the Mighty Mississippi this summer, kayaking the entire 2,300 miles of the river, raising more than $20,00o for Interfaith Compassion Ministry in Oxford. Read about their adventure in today’s EAGLE. (September 8, 2011, Page 1)

Isn’t it too soon for another 100-year flood?

We’ll never see a flood like the one in 1927. There will never be a hurricane like Camille again. You’d think we’d learn to never say “never” about weather and related disasters. Even talk about 100-year floods and such are hard to understand, so Editor Don Whitten takes a closer look at what a 100-year event really is. (May 18, 2011, Page 4)

Foolish Mistakes

Few aviators complete their careers without escaping dangerous incidents, usually when they have little flying experience. Local columnist Jimmy Reed relates the stories of his two big escapes, one when attempting a foolish maneuver and the other when he almost hit another aircraft. (April 26, 2011, Page 4)

Quake threat real

Officials from MEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, local emergency managers from surrounding counties, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and other emergency response agencies have been attending the Earthquake Mid-Term Planning Conference this week in Oxford to discuss the state’s preparedness for earthquakes and the threats posed to north Mississippi as part of Earthquake Awareness Week. (January 21, 2011, Page 1A, 5A)

The Great Mississippi Bear Hunt: Circa 1902

President Theodore Roosevelt was exhausted from mediating a solution to the strike by the United Mine Workers in the coal fields of America. T.R. was in need of a short vacation and this hunt would produce what Brinkley calls the most popular toy ever manufactured — the Teddy Bear.

He decided to accept a long-stranding invitation to come to Mississippi for the bear-hunting season. He had recently invited Booker T. Washington to a dinner at the White House and some Southerners had vilified him for this invitation. Thus his trip to Mississippi did have somewhat of a political overtone. One of his hosts was Stuyvesant Fish, the president of the Illinois Central Railroad. He wrote to Fish, “My experience is that to try to combine a hunt and a picnic, generally means a poor picnic and always a spoiled hunt. Every additional man on a hunt tends to hurt it. Of course I am only going because I want to hunt and do see I get the first bear without fail.” Little did he know how he would be presented the first black bear of their hunt. (October 29, 2010, Page 2B)

Grief over Gulf

The April 20 explosion of an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico has brought back feelings of despair to many affected by Hurricane Katrina. It’s also brought together people to try to help with the cleanup and other parts of dealing with the oil spill, including a group of University of Mississippi students called Ole Miss Students for a Green Campus.

For details on the drive to collect supplies to protect and clean up the coastline, contact sgc.olemiss@gmail.com or call 1-866-448-5816. (May 4, 2010, Page 1)

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