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Monday, July 28, 2014

L.Q.C. Lamar

Lamar House officially opens

The doors to the L.Q.C. Lamar House Museum officially opened Friday after a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held at the newly renovated home. (April 4, 2011, Page 1A)

Museum aims to teach visitors about Lamar

Exhibits have arrived at the newly renovation L.Q.C Lamar House Museum this week. Each kiosk and plaque tell the story of the statesman best known for his artful use of words. See today’s Oxford Living to get a first glimpse of the new exhibits. (March 11, 2011, Page 1B)

The Lamar Rifles: Company G, 11th Mississippi Regiment

Columnist and local historian Jack Lamar Mayfield tells us more about the The Lamar Rifles this week — the group of Lafayette County men who made were one of the first local volunteer units to organize. The unit was named after L.Q.C. Lamar. Read more about the brave men who made up this unit in today’s Oxford Living. (February 25, 2011, Page 3B)

Oxford, Ole Miss in 1893: The year ‘Big Todd’ Wade was hung

Historian and local columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield tells is what was going on around Oxford in 1893, the year the community film, “The Hanging of Big Todd Wade,” is set in. The movie premiers Saturday at the Oxford Film Festival. Mayfield has a part in the film. (February 11, 2011, Page 3B)

Lamar, Isom local delegates to Secession Convention

Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield writes about when LQ.C. Lamar and Dr. Thomas Dudley Isom were elected to represent Lafayette County in the Secession Convention in 1860 on page 2 B  in today’s Oxford Living section. (January 7, 2011, Page 2B)

Girl Scouts’ Double Decker tour visits Lamar House, UM campus

Oxford Living columnist and local historian Jack Lamar Mayfield writes about spending time with a local Girl Scout troop as they tour Oxford and the University of Mississippi on the Double Decker bus. (November 19, 2010, Page 3B)

Lamar and the Taylor farm experiment

In the early 1880s, L.Q.C. Lamar was thinking about retirement from public life. He started purchasing land in the small town of Taylor, just south on Oxford. By 1882, he had acquired 550 acres along the Mississippi Central Railroad. On a hill overlooking the farm, he had a small wooden frame home built in the New England farmhouse style. There were also barns and shelters for the stock, and a dairy barn.

He wrote to his farm manager, William Knight, “that place is to be my future home at the end of my services here, I shall go to that place and spend the remainder of my life. You see, therefore, that you are not merely in charge of a nice farm and fine stock, but that you will contribute much to my future comfort.” (October 22, 2010, Page 2B)

Solitude: Lamar and agriculture

L.Q.C. Lamar is known nationally as a congressman, senator, Secretary of the Interior and associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, but he is not known for his interest in, and ownership of, farming operations. In 1854, Lamar was living in his home state of Georgia. He had established a law firm in Macon but he did not have any use for his extensive slave holdings. (October 15, 2010, Page 3B)

L.Q.C. Lamar statue unveiled

The unveiling of the L.Q.C. Lamar statue on Saturday brought a crowd of people to celebrate the legacy of the former Senator and also celebrate the arts. The bronze statue, created by local artist Bill Beckwith, now greets visitors to the entrance of the museum and former home of Lamar. (October 11, 2010, Page 1)

‘Oxford in the Civil War’ – A new book from History Press

“Oxford in the Civil War: Battle for a Vanquished Land” by Stephen Enzweiler is the new book just published by The History Press of Charleston, S.C. The author is a journalist and senior editor for “Y’all” magazine published here in Oxford and he writes extensively about Mississippi and the South.

I really didn’t find out anything that I didn’t already know, but the way the author has presented the data makes for pleasurable reading. I have read these stories over the years in various different places, but Enzweiler presents them in manner that follows Oxford from its earliest day through the war years. (October 8, 2010, Page 2B)

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