Online Edition
Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Jim Hood

Local Libertarians claim victory in court battle

A U.S. Federal judge has ruled in favor of a group of Oxonions who filed a suit in 2011 claiming the Mississippi Secretary of State requirements for fully regulated political committees. (October 2, 2013, Page 1)

Mortgage consortium aimed to help keep homes

For those going through, or attempting to avoid foreclosure on your home, the Mississippi Attorney General’s Office is holding a mortgage consortium from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Oxford Conference Center that will provide legal help and information. (April 8, 2013, Page 3)

Taking a look at AG, charter schools in state

Local columnist T.J. Ray writes about the state’s attorney general and public education and looks at changes being made by the state Legislature. (February 27, 2012, Page 4A)

Letters to the Editor

Lena L. Ward writes to take issue with two measures in the Mississippi Legislature – taking power away from Attorney General Jim Hood and allowing charter schools in the public school system. (February 23, 2012, Page 4)

Some pardons on hold

At the request of Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood, a Hinds County Circuit Court judge has granted an injunction to stop the release of former Gov. Haley Barbour’s pardoned criminals.

A preliminary injunction hearing has been set for 3 p.m. on Jan. 23 before Judge Tomie Green in Hinds County.

Hood requested the injunction Wednesday afternoon claiming that Barbour might have violated the state Constitution by pardoning some inmates who failed to give sufficient public notice that they were seeking clemency. (January 12, 2012, Page 1)

Governor signs law designed to help victims

A domestic violence-related bill  was signed into law recently by Gov. Haley Barbour that will make it a misdemeanor  criminal offense for someone to prevent a victim from seeking emergency medical or law enforcement assistance. (March 1, 2011, Page 1)

Retiring judge honored

The retirement party for the Honorable Circuit Court Judge Henry L. Lackey was suppose to be a “roast and toast” event. While many of the speeches made by about 16 people about the Calhoun County judge caused a few chuckles — and even a few tears, it was Lackey himself who invoked rounds of hearty laughter as he lovingly roasted them in return.

He announced his intent to retire at a Christmas party in 2009. His term will end Dec. 31.  About 300 people attended Lackey’s retirement party Thursday at the Oxford Conference Center. (November 5, 2010, Page 1A)

Pontotoc man challenges voter ID Petition

Ninty-six-year-old Earl Tucker is the lead defendant in a lawsuit filed Wednesday at the U.S. District Court of North Mississippi in Oxford against Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann, Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood and the state of Mississippi that challenges the Mississippi Voter Identification petition that is scheduled to appear on the November 2011 statewide ballot. The measure, if successful, would require photo identification at all voter polls in the state.

“I thought voter intimidation had long disappeared, but I was wrong,” Tucker said in the lawsuit. “I will fight to keep my rights.” (October 22, 2010, Page 2A)

Oil Sick: A sheen worse than Charlie

LIES AND OTHER TRUTHS – This week, Oxford Town columnist Jim Dees delves into the current oil spill disaster on the Gulf Coast and what appears to be a perpetual recovery effort in the region. Who’s responsible and who should get stuck with the cleanup tab? Check out this week’s Oxford Town for Dees’  thorough, witty and wise coverage of the tragic situation. (May 6, 2010, Page 5)

Chandler Nissan