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Monday, September 1, 2014

Jeremiah Gage

The ebb-tide of the Confederacy

Jeremiah Gage, a member of the University Greys, wrote a final letter to his mother in the hours just before he died from wounds he suffered at Gettysburg. History columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield shares that letter with us today in the Oxford Living section. (July 26, 2013, Page 2B)

Gage, one of Gettysburg’s casualties

History columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield returns to Gettysburg and the death of former Ole Miss student and member of the University Greys, Jeremiah Gage. (July 19, 2013, Page 2B)

Mississippi 11th moves to NC for winter camp

Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield writes about a civil exchange during the Civil War when Confederates and Yankees put down their guns to exchange newspapers. (November 16, 2012, Page 2B)

MS 11th plays vital role in Battle of Seven Pines

Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield continues educating us on the involvement of local Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. This week, he writes about the Battle of Seven Pines, one of the war’s deadliest battles. (May 25, 2012, Page 2B)

Men of the 11th write home for Christmas

Historian and Jack Lamar shares more letters written by Confederate soldiers during Christmas 1861. (December 9, 2011, Page 3B)

University students prepare for Civil War

Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield takes us back to 1861 when a group of University of Mississippi students formed the University Grey who later became Company A of the 11th Mississippi Regiment. (January 14, 2011, Page 3B)

‘Oxford in the Civil War’ – A new book from History Press

“Oxford in the Civil War: Battle for a Vanquished Land” by Stephen Enzweiler is the new book just published by The History Press of Charleston, S.C. The author is a journalist and senior editor for “Y’all” magazine published here in Oxford and he writes extensively about Mississippi and the South.

I really didn’t find out anything that I didn’t already know, but the way the author has presented the data makes for pleasurable reading. I have read these stories over the years in various different places, but Enzweiler presents them in manner that follows Oxford from its earliest day through the war years. (October 8, 2010, Page 2B)

Chandler Nissan