Online Edition
Monday, July 28, 2014

Features

The lonely cookbook

When I left home at the age of 23 to go to Caracas, Venezuela, I took two large cardboard boxes with me containing school supplies (as I was going to teach fourth grade), linens, a few books and some clothes. I also took my grandmother’s 1950 Betty Crocker cookbook.

My roommate and I ate out most of the time, but when we did decide to stay home we each had our cooking strengths. She could make chili and I could make popcorn and chocolate chip cookies. We lived together for three years and never made a proper meal — and my cookbook was never opened. (October 22, 2010, Page 2B)

Share this Oxford Eagle story.

    Families stop to pose for photos at St. Peter’s Pumpkin Patch

    With his big brother and sister sitting next to him, surrounded by pumpkins of all sizes, 2-year-old Mack Shelton was more interested in watching the large construction equipment digging up the road on Jackson Avenue on Wednesday afternoon than smiling for his mother’s camera.

    “I’m not sure I got a good one this year,” said Mack’s mom, Emily Shelton, with an exasperated smile.

    Moments later, Mack was all smiles as he ran around the pumpkin patch at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church with his brother, Sam, 8, and sister, Emma, 5, following close behind as they searched for their favorite pumpkins.

    “Oh sure, now he smiles,” Shelton said with a chuckle.

    The Sheltons have come to the church every year for the past six years to take photographs and pick out the family pumpkins. (October 22, 2010, Page 1B)

    Share this Oxford Eagle story.

      An early start in education focus

      Bela J. “Buddy” Chain Jr., president of the Oxford School District Board of Trustees, talks with Senior Staff Writer Lucy Schultze about growing up on a high school campus in Olive Branch and his roles in public education through the years in this week’s “A Conversation With…”. (October 21, 2010, Page 3)

      Share this Oxford Eagle story.

        Matching taste with apple season since 6500 B.C.

        EAGLE Contributor Beth Ziegenhorn helps everyone kick off apple season with a recipe for a crunchy apple walnut salad. (October 20, 2010, Page 7)

        Share this Oxford Eagle story.

          Solitude: Lamar and agriculture

          L.Q.C. Lamar is known nationally as a congressman, senator, Secretary of the Interior and associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, but he is not known for his interest in, and ownership of, farming operations. In 1854, Lamar was living in his home state of Georgia. He had established a law firm in Macon but he did not have any use for his extensive slave holdings. (October 15, 2010, Page 3B)

          Share this Oxford Eagle story.

            A state Lotto can make people rich in education

            How many times have you heard, “If I win the lottery I would …”?

            Chances are, if you are from Mississippi, not very often. I grew up in Florida and turning 18 meant one thing — being able to play the lottery. It was one of the first things I did on my way to work on my birthday. I bought both a scratch off and a Florida Lotto ticket and, although I did not win that week’s lotto (or any week’s), the excitement was just as fun.

            As a student, the lottery would be a great benefit for myself and my classmates. The game’s main purpose — besides allowing those lucky few to win large amounts of money — is to fund programs for education. With the current budget cuts and the rise in price of education, a lottery could help many students and schools with extra funding that is so desperately needed by many. (October 15, 2010, Page 1B)

            Share this Oxford Eagle story.

              Local historic figures return for one night only

              Kaye Bryant is taking her roll in this year’s Spirits of Oxford seriously.

              Playing the Chickasaw Princess Hoka who sold the land that is now Oxford to settlers, Bryant is doing more than just donning a black braided wig.

              “I learned how to speak a little bit of the language,” she said Thursday. “It was a challenge coming up with an accent to sound somewhat authentic but I’ve loved doing it.”

              Bryant is one of several people who perform in this year’s Spirits of Oxford being held at 6 and 8 p.m. Oct. 22 at St. Peter’s Cemetery. (October 15, 2010, Page 1B)

              Share this Oxford Eagle story.

                A helping hand for Haiti’s poor

                Macon Dukes, a specialized occupational therapist with Southern Hand Centers in Oxford and Batesville, spent the first two weeks of August serving patients at the Northwest Haiti Christian Mission. Dukes discusses her time in Haiti with EAGLE senior staff writer Lucy Schultze in the this week’s “A Conversation With..” (October 14, 2010, Page 3)

                Share this Oxford Eagle story.

                  Finding the perfect Grove spot is like Manifest Destiny

                  I was always fascinated by the idea that families would gather all of their worldly belongings into one wagon, brave the elements of the unforgiving west, and race to stake their claim to something they hadn’t even seen before. I remember trying to imagine what that must feel like. I would imagine the fear of not knowing what lay ahead and the anxiousness over this potentially dangerous, one way trip.

                  Then I found the “Grove” at Ole Miss and didn’t have to imagine anymore! (October 8, 2010, Page 1B)

                  Share this Oxford Eagle story.

                    Local chefs, farmer work together to present fanciful meal

                    Outstanding in the Field is described as “a roving culinary adventure,” a kind of restaurant without walls. The founders of this moveable feast promote the use of local produce in local meals prepared by local chefs to be enjoyed by local foodies.

                    Roughly 150 people took part in the special $180-per-ticket dinner which celebrated not just the chef who prepared the meal, but also the farmer and the fields that helped produce the meal.

                    As people drank a glass of Riesling, they watched as chef John Currence walked through the garden, selecting peppers, radishes and other vegetables to help add to the meal. (October 8, 2010, Page 1B)

                    Share this Oxford Eagle story.

                       Page 93 of 111  « First  ... « 91  92  93  94  95 » ...  Last » 
                      The Highlands, A Private Lake Community First National Bank