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Saturday, November 1, 2014

Features

Just for the Holidays – ‘Straw and Hay’

Luisa Arico serves up another of her Italian hits in this Thanksgiving recipe for Paglia e Fieno for four. (November 24, 2010, Page 8A)

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    Making Christmas means more than just a lists for Santa

    Columnist and freelance writer LeahMcCormick writes about making lasting Christmas traditions and listening to her inner child in this week’s Oxford Living. (November 19, 2010, Page 1B)

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      Students get hands-on experience with clinical work

      Kaylee Merritt, 16, is a second year student in the Allied Health program which is offered to students from Oxford and Lafayette high schools. Once a week for six weeks, the students shadow at local health-related businesses or clinics. They also attend class once a week for about an hour and a half. The course is taught by Sandi Allen, a registered nurse with a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. Last week she shadowed at Klepzig Pharmacy. (November 19, 2010, Page 1B)

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        Girl Scouts’ Double Decker tour visits Lamar House, UM campus

        Oxford Living columnist and local historian Jack Lamar Mayfield writes about spending time with a local Girl Scout troop as they tour Oxford and the University of Mississippi on the Double Decker bus. (November 19, 2010, Page 3B)

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          Finding a balance that puts kids first

          Jerry Pegues, 31, of Oxford balances a busy schedule each day. Pegues works two jobs, but still finds time to be a positive influence on his children’s lives. Pegues sat down to talk about his busy life and how it all came about with EAGLE senior staff writer Lucy Schultze in this week’s “A Conversation With…” (November 18, 2010, Page 3)

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            University trustee Col. James Brown and student malicious mischief

            We have all read or have heard stories about malicious mischief by college students around the United States. The students of the University of Mississippi have also, over the years, been accused of perpetrating mischief during their years on campus. The following is an event that happened in April of 1852. It concerns one of the first trustees of the Ole Miss, Col. James Brown, and his horse, while it was hitched in front of the Lyceum.

            First I would like to give you a little background on Col. James Brown. Brown came to Lafayette County in 1836 and was an extensive purchaser of Indian lands in the county. He paid $11,040 for 11 and a half sections of land by 1837. A section of land is 640 acres.

            This was in the first two years after the Chickasaw lands were opened up for sale by the government. His purchases were widely scattered over the area, but mostly located in those parts of the county where large land purchasers were operating. His holdings were considered extensive for the day as they would be today.

            Brown being one of the original setters of Lafayette County and one of the wealthiest landowners, was elected to the Board of Trustees of the university in 1846. He was very active in the governance of the university and served as a trustee until 1870, when the Republican legislature reorganized the board. (November 12, 2010, Page 2B)

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              Seeing our amazing world through the eyes of an infant

              A few months ago I wrote an article entitled, “Waiting for Shirley Cate.” In it, I described my excitement surrounding the arrival of my first born child. Ironically, that same week the article was published, our little girl arrived.

              She was healthy and oh-so-adorable. Since then, every morning I can’t wait to discover more about my little daughter. As our baby grows, becomes more chubby, makes more noises and funny faces, I get to learn more about the little girl who melts my heart. As a parent, all you want is for that baby to smile at you. She smiles and all in the world is right.

              So far, Aunt Fanny is one of Shirley Cate’s favorites. Aunt Fanny has the uncanny ability of making Shirley Cate giggle and smile every time. Don’t get me wrong, Shirley Cate loves to look at her Mommy and Daddy too. Sometimes I look for excuses to wake her up so I can see her smile. (By the way, side note — ever wake a sleeping baby. Smiling is the furthest thing from that scenario. Trust me.) Fanny, though, has the power of hilarity and entertainment, at least for a four-month-old. I haven’t been too sure of what it is or why Shirley Cate thinks Fanny is so funny, but she does. (November 12, 2010, Page 3B)

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                Connecting vets with their benefits

                Hal Staten helps guide local veterans through the maze of paperwork that stands between them and their benefits. Read what Staten has to say about his 23 years serving as the county’s veterans in this week’s “A Conversation With…” (November 11, 2010, Page 3)

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                  Bulbs should be planted now for springtime enjoyment

                  After a long, dreary winter, fall planted bulbs fill the garden with bursts of floral sunshine in a celebration of spring. What could be a more welcoming sight! Bulbs produce a colorful display with little effort. Once planted, they give years of enjoyment with little care.

                  For simplicity, the word bulb describes plants that store energy for their seasonal cycle in an underground storage organ. These include “true” bulbs such as daffodils and tulips, corms such as crocus and tubers, rhizomes and tuberous roots. The time to plant spring blooming bulbs is now (November) before the first frost as all bulbs need certain “chilling time” with temperatures below 40 degrees for at least 12-14 weeks in order to bloom. Buy good bulbs with no blemishes, bruises or soft spots — the larger the bulb, the better the bloom. Bulbs need plenty of sunlight and rich, well-drained soil with a PH of 6.0 to 7.0. Work the soil to a depth of about 12 inches and add a half-inch to one-third inch organic material or peat moss, compost or aged bark. The rule of thumb is to plant them twice as deep as they are tall. So if you have a 3-inch bulb such as a daffodil, plant 6 inches deep. You can even plant smaller ones above larger ones. (November 5, 2010, Page 5B)

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                    Ole Miss’ first All-American: Bruiser Kinard

                    When we have a football weekend in Oxford and the University of Mississippi, I usually write about the team we are playing. We do not have much of a history with our opponent this weekend so I have decided to write about the first of many All-Americans who have played for Ole Miss. He was a man who never strayed far from Ole Miss after he made his way to Oxford in the 1930s. When you think of Ole Miss football, Bruiser Kinard is at the forefront of players and coaches who come to mind.

                    Forty-four years after Ole Miss fielded its first football team, we would have our first All-American. Frank Manning Kinard had first been invited to play college football for the University of Alabama. He had been an outstanding high school player at Rolling Fork High School and had made the All-Southern high school team as a tackle. Coach Frank Thomas had Kinard come to Alabama at the start of his freshman year in 1934.

                    Kinard’s stay at Alabama would be short lived. When he got to the campus, the coach found out Kinard had married in his senior year of high school. Coach Thomas said to Kinard, “I sure do appreciate your coming over here but we have two married players now and they haven’t panned out.” He left Alabama and Martin Miller of Meridian and Clyde Hester of Jackson collaborated to get the young married athlete into Ole Miss. Webb Burke, an assistant coach, rented part of his house to Kinard and his wife. This would be the beginning of a life-long marriage of Ole Miss and Frank Manning Kinard. (November 5, 2010, Page 2B)

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