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Sunday, October 26, 2014

Oxford Living

Families stop to pose for photos at St. Peter’s Pumpkin Patch

With his big brother and sister sitting next to him, surrounded by pumpkins of all sizes, 2-year-old Mack Shelton was more interested in watching the large construction equipment digging up the road on Jackson Avenue on Wednesday afternoon than smiling for his mother’s camera.

“I’m not sure I got a good one this year,” said Mack’s mom, Emily Shelton, with an exasperated smile.

Moments later, Mack was all smiles as he ran around the pumpkin patch at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church with his brother, Sam, 8, and sister, Emma, 5, following close behind as they searched for their favorite pumpkins.

“Oh sure, now he smiles,” Shelton said with a chuckle.

The Sheltons have come to the church every year for the past six years to take photographs and pick out the family pumpkins. (October 22, 2010, Page 1B)

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    Solitude: Lamar and agriculture

    L.Q.C. Lamar is known nationally as a congressman, senator, Secretary of the Interior and associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, but he is not known for his interest in, and ownership of, farming operations. In 1854, Lamar was living in his home state of Georgia. He had established a law firm in Macon but he did not have any use for his extensive slave holdings. (October 15, 2010, Page 3B)

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      A state Lotto can make people rich in education

      How many times have you heard, “If I win the lottery I would …”?

      Chances are, if you are from Mississippi, not very often. I grew up in Florida and turning 18 meant one thing — being able to play the lottery. It was one of the first things I did on my way to work on my birthday. I bought both a scratch off and a Florida Lotto ticket and, although I did not win that week’s lotto (or any week’s), the excitement was just as fun.

      As a student, the lottery would be a great benefit for myself and my classmates. The game’s main purpose — besides allowing those lucky few to win large amounts of money — is to fund programs for education. With the current budget cuts and the rise in price of education, a lottery could help many students and schools with extra funding that is so desperately needed by many. (October 15, 2010, Page 1B)

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        Local historic figures return for one night only

        Kaye Bryant is taking her roll in this year’s Spirits of Oxford seriously.

        Playing the Chickasaw Princess Hoka who sold the land that is now Oxford to settlers, Bryant is doing more than just donning a black braided wig.

        “I learned how to speak a little bit of the language,” she said Thursday. “It was a challenge coming up with an accent to sound somewhat authentic but I’ve loved doing it.”

        Bryant is one of several people who perform in this year’s Spirits of Oxford being held at 6 and 8 p.m. Oct. 22 at St. Peter’s Cemetery. (October 15, 2010, Page 1B)

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          Finding the perfect Grove spot is like Manifest Destiny

          I was always fascinated by the idea that families would gather all of their worldly belongings into one wagon, brave the elements of the unforgiving west, and race to stake their claim to something they hadn’t even seen before. I remember trying to imagine what that must feel like. I would imagine the fear of not knowing what lay ahead and the anxiousness over this potentially dangerous, one way trip.

          Then I found the “Grove” at Ole Miss and didn’t have to imagine anymore! (October 8, 2010, Page 1B)

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            Local chefs, farmer work together to present fanciful meal

            Outstanding in the Field is described as “a roving culinary adventure,” a kind of restaurant without walls. The founders of this moveable feast promote the use of local produce in local meals prepared by local chefs to be enjoyed by local foodies.

            Roughly 150 people took part in the special $180-per-ticket dinner which celebrated not just the chef who prepared the meal, but also the farmer and the fields that helped produce the meal.

            As people drank a glass of Riesling, they watched as chef John Currence walked through the garden, selecting peppers, radishes and other vegetables to help add to the meal. (October 8, 2010, Page 1B)

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              ‘Oxford in the Civil War’ – A new book from History Press

              “Oxford in the Civil War: Battle for a Vanquished Land” by Stephen Enzweiler is the new book just published by The History Press of Charleston, S.C. The author is a journalist and senior editor for “Y’all” magazine published here in Oxford and he writes extensively about Mississippi and the South.

              I really didn’t find out anything that I didn’t already know, but the way the author has presented the data makes for pleasurable reading. I have read these stories over the years in various different places, but Enzweiler presents them in manner that follows Oxford from its earliest day through the war years. (October 8, 2010, Page 2B)

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                Sharing a meal, fellowship in the Grove

                St. Peter’s Episcopal Church and Second Baptist Missionary Church are bridging the racial gap in Oxford through communication, education — and football.

                The two churches broke bread — and finger foods — Saturday in the Grove before the Ole Miss-Fresno State game during their annual tailgating get-together. (October 1, 2010, Page 1B)

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                  Living the American Dream is doing what makes you happy

                  Oxford Generations columnist Leah McCormick writes about living out your dream this week:

                  Years ago, I thought I had the job of my dreams, the one I’d worked so hard for — and then I stepped off the treadmill …

                  I’ll never forget my first day off. I just wanted to be in the moment with my children. I did laundry, got a wild hair and hung them on the clothes line. My daughter, Rivers, stood on an upside down 5-gallon bucket beside me and “helped.” The wind was blowing slightly, moving the sheets slowly in the wind. It was so “Little House on the Prairie.” Rivers beamed at me. I beamed right back. (October 1, 2010, Page 1B)

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                    Gardeners play key role in stopping invasive plants

                    The scary feature of invasive plants is their ability to compete above and below the ground and outgrow surrounding plants. The concern, Master Gardener Joe Ann Allen writes, is that invasive plants can over power native species and cause soil erosion, create fire hazards, deprive animal and insect life of food and shelter and have a negative impact on fisheries, recreational areas and public water supplies.

                    A good example of this negative effect is the spread of the beautifully flowered purple loosestrife. One mature plant can produce more than 2 million seeds, all with a high germination rate. It is estimated that more than 4 million acres are now affected by purple loosestrife’s escape from the garden and it is costing an estimated $45 million dollars annually in control efforts. (October 1, 2010, Page 2B)

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