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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Oxford Living

Bulbs should be planted now for springtime enjoyment

After a long, dreary winter, fall planted bulbs fill the garden with bursts of floral sunshine in a celebration of spring. What could be a more welcoming sight! Bulbs produce a colorful display with little effort. Once planted, they give years of enjoyment with little care.

For simplicity, the word bulb describes plants that store energy for their seasonal cycle in an underground storage organ. These include “true” bulbs such as daffodils and tulips, corms such as crocus and tubers, rhizomes and tuberous roots. The time to plant spring blooming bulbs is now (November) before the first frost as all bulbs need certain “chilling time” with temperatures below 40 degrees for at least 12-14 weeks in order to bloom. Buy good bulbs with no blemishes, bruises or soft spots — the larger the bulb, the better the bloom. Bulbs need plenty of sunlight and rich, well-drained soil with a PH of 6.0 to 7.0. Work the soil to a depth of about 12 inches and add a half-inch to one-third inch organic material or peat moss, compost or aged bark. The rule of thumb is to plant them twice as deep as they are tall. So if you have a 3-inch bulb such as a daffodil, plant 6 inches deep. You can even plant smaller ones above larger ones. (November 5, 2010, Page 5B)

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    Ole Miss’ first All-American: Bruiser Kinard

    When we have a football weekend in Oxford and the University of Mississippi, I usually write about the team we are playing. We do not have much of a history with our opponent this weekend so I have decided to write about the first of many All-Americans who have played for Ole Miss. He was a man who never strayed far from Ole Miss after he made his way to Oxford in the 1930s. When you think of Ole Miss football, Bruiser Kinard is at the forefront of players and coaches who come to mind.

    Forty-four years after Ole Miss fielded its first football team, we would have our first All-American. Frank Manning Kinard had first been invited to play college football for the University of Alabama. He had been an outstanding high school player at Rolling Fork High School and had made the All-Southern high school team as a tackle. Coach Frank Thomas had Kinard come to Alabama at the start of his freshman year in 1934.

    Kinard’s stay at Alabama would be short lived. When he got to the campus, the coach found out Kinard had married in his senior year of high school. Coach Thomas said to Kinard, “I sure do appreciate your coming over here but we have two married players now and they haven’t panned out.” He left Alabama and Martin Miller of Meridian and Clyde Hester of Jackson collaborated to get the young married athlete into Ole Miss. Webb Burke, an assistant coach, rented part of his house to Kinard and his wife. This would be the beginning of a life-long marriage of Ole Miss and Frank Manning Kinard. (November 5, 2010, Page 2B)

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      Past, present come together at Homecoming game

      Pat C. Lamar isn’t going to let a simple thing like a broken hand, wrist and arm keep her from attending this weekend’s Homecoming Queen Reunion at the University of Mississippi on Saturday. Lamar was crowned Homecoming Queen in 1961.

      She will be one of 36 former homecoming queens who have registered to attend the first-ever queen reunion.

      The chairwoman of the reunion, Annabeth

      The idea for a reunion came from former Homecoming Queen, Annabeth Freeman Wyatt, who was crowned queen in 2000.

      Each former queen will be recognized individually at a welcome reception at 9 a.m. Saturday in Butler Auditorium inside the Triplett Alumni Center. (November 5, 2010, Page 1B)

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        The Great Mississippi Bear Hunt: Circa 1902

        President Theodore Roosevelt was exhausted from mediating a solution to the strike by the United Mine Workers in the coal fields of America. T.R. was in need of a short vacation and this hunt would produce what Brinkley calls the most popular toy ever manufactured — the Teddy Bear.

        He decided to accept a long-stranding invitation to come to Mississippi for the bear-hunting season. He had recently invited Booker T. Washington to a dinner at the White House and some Southerners had vilified him for this invitation. Thus his trip to Mississippi did have somewhat of a political overtone. One of his hosts was Stuyvesant Fish, the president of the Illinois Central Railroad. He wrote to Fish, “My experience is that to try to combine a hunt and a picnic, generally means a poor picnic and always a spoiled hunt. Every additional man on a hunt tends to hurt it. Of course I am only going because I want to hunt and do see I get the first bear without fail.” Little did he know how he would be presented the first black bear of their hunt. (October 29, 2010, Page 2B)

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          Ole Miss to show university’s first 3-D commercial

          The 90-second film will be played at the end of half-time during Saturday’s game on the “jumbotron.” The 3D glasses will be placed on each seat in the stadium Friday night and Saturday morning by a local Boy Scout troop. The theme of the promo had been kept tightly under wraps until recently. However, a poster made to promote the event gives away some clues the film will feature Ole Miss athletes as giants.

          (more…) (October 29, 2010, Page 1B)

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            Lamar and the Taylor farm experiment

            In the early 1880s, L.Q.C. Lamar was thinking about retirement from public life. He started purchasing land in the small town of Taylor, just south on Oxford. By 1882, he had acquired 550 acres along the Mississippi Central Railroad. On a hill overlooking the farm, he had a small wooden frame home built in the New England farmhouse style. There were also barns and shelters for the stock, and a dairy barn.

            He wrote to his farm manager, William Knight, “that place is to be my future home at the end of my services here, I shall go to that place and spend the remainder of my life. You see, therefore, that you are not merely in charge of a nice farm and fine stock, but that you will contribute much to my future comfort.” (October 22, 2010, Page 2B)

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              The lonely cookbook

              When I left home at the age of 23 to go to Caracas, Venezuela, I took two large cardboard boxes with me containing school supplies (as I was going to teach fourth grade), linens, a few books and some clothes. I also took my grandmother’s 1950 Betty Crocker cookbook.

              My roommate and I ate out most of the time, but when we did decide to stay home we each had our cooking strengths. She could make chili and I could make popcorn and chocolate chip cookies. We lived together for three years and never made a proper meal — and my cookbook was never opened. (October 22, 2010, Page 2B)

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                Families stop to pose for photos at St. Peter’s Pumpkin Patch

                With his big brother and sister sitting next to him, surrounded by pumpkins of all sizes, 2-year-old Mack Shelton was more interested in watching the large construction equipment digging up the road on Jackson Avenue on Wednesday afternoon than smiling for his mother’s camera.

                “I’m not sure I got a good one this year,” said Mack’s mom, Emily Shelton, with an exasperated smile.

                Moments later, Mack was all smiles as he ran around the pumpkin patch at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church with his brother, Sam, 8, and sister, Emma, 5, following close behind as they searched for their favorite pumpkins.

                “Oh sure, now he smiles,” Shelton said with a chuckle.

                The Sheltons have come to the church every year for the past six years to take photographs and pick out the family pumpkins. (October 22, 2010, Page 1B)

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                  Solitude: Lamar and agriculture

                  L.Q.C. Lamar is known nationally as a congressman, senator, Secretary of the Interior and associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, but he is not known for his interest in, and ownership of, farming operations. In 1854, Lamar was living in his home state of Georgia. He had established a law firm in Macon but he did not have any use for his extensive slave holdings. (October 15, 2010, Page 3B)

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                    A state Lotto can make people rich in education

                    How many times have you heard, “If I win the lottery I would …”?

                    Chances are, if you are from Mississippi, not very often. I grew up in Florida and turning 18 meant one thing — being able to play the lottery. It was one of the first things I did on my way to work on my birthday. I bought both a scratch off and a Florida Lotto ticket and, although I did not win that week’s lotto (or any week’s), the excitement was just as fun.

                    As a student, the lottery would be a great benefit for myself and my classmates. The game’s main purpose — besides allowing those lucky few to win large amounts of money — is to fund programs for education. With the current budget cuts and the rise in price of education, a lottery could help many students and schools with extra funding that is so desperately needed by many. (October 15, 2010, Page 1B)

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