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Friday, November 21, 2014

Gardening

Nurture your garden, reap the rewards

Master Gardener Donna Long gives us tips on how to keep our annuals and perennials looking lovely throughout the summer (June 3, 2011, Page 2B)

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    Taking a look at shade-loving plants

    Heuchera is a favorite shade plant.

    Master Gardener Donna Long and fellow Master Gardener Kathryn Clark share with readers their favorite shade-loving plants.

     (May 13, 2011, Page 2B)

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      Gardening made simple

      Master Gardener Ayse Altinakar gives us a crash course in gardening for beginners in today’s Oxford Living.

       (April 1, 2011, Page 2B)

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        Winter gardening

        Master Gardener Barbara Sherrod White shows us how our gardens can thrive throughout the cold winter months. See today’s Oxford Living. (March 4, 2011, Page 3B)

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          Getting what you want in your garden

          Many believe seed starting is difficult and yields few positive results, but as with most things simply following a few important rules will assure success. Master Gardener Susan Boehm tell us that starting your seeds will not only give you a terrific sense of accomplishment, but you will also save a significant amount of money. (February 4, 2011, Page 3B)

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            Getting your garden ready for the warm weather

            Gardener Dicki King tells us that January is time to focus on getting ready for spring and we should take time to plan for the next few weeks. There is really much to be done.  The first of February is a good time to select new bushes and trees for planting. (January 28, 2011, Page 2B)

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              Trees can make a landscape more beautiful

              Some homeowners are lucky and have their homes sited in areas where the trees seem to have been naturally placed. But for those of us who live in newer subdivisions, where all the trees were removed prior to development, we are challenged with incorporating trees back into our landscapes. Adding trees back will not only improve the appearance of a property but also increase its value. (January 7, 2011, Page 2B)

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                Holiday wishes: A few of our favorite things?

                The Education Committee of Lafayette County Master Gardeners, under the leadership of Chair Eileen Leonard, surveyed its membership and compiled a few of the member’s “favorite things.” To learn what your favorite gardener might want for Christmas, see Susan Boehm’s column on page 2B. (December 3, 2010, Page 2B)

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                  Bulbs should be planted now for springtime enjoyment

                  After a long, dreary winter, fall planted bulbs fill the garden with bursts of floral sunshine in a celebration of spring. What could be a more welcoming sight! Bulbs produce a colorful display with little effort. Once planted, they give years of enjoyment with little care.

                  For simplicity, the word bulb describes plants that store energy for their seasonal cycle in an underground storage organ. These include “true” bulbs such as daffodils and tulips, corms such as crocus and tubers, rhizomes and tuberous roots. The time to plant spring blooming bulbs is now (November) before the first frost as all bulbs need certain “chilling time” with temperatures below 40 degrees for at least 12-14 weeks in order to bloom. Buy good bulbs with no blemishes, bruises or soft spots — the larger the bulb, the better the bloom. Bulbs need plenty of sunlight and rich, well-drained soil with a PH of 6.0 to 7.0. Work the soil to a depth of about 12 inches and add a half-inch to one-third inch organic material or peat moss, compost or aged bark. The rule of thumb is to plant them twice as deep as they are tall. So if you have a 3-inch bulb such as a daffodil, plant 6 inches deep. You can even plant smaller ones above larger ones. (November 5, 2010, Page 5B)

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                    The lonely cookbook

                    When I left home at the age of 23 to go to Caracas, Venezuela, I took two large cardboard boxes with me containing school supplies (as I was going to teach fourth grade), linens, a few books and some clothes. I also took my grandmother’s 1950 Betty Crocker cookbook.

                    My roommate and I ate out most of the time, but when we did decide to stay home we each had our cooking strengths. She could make chili and I could make popcorn and chocolate chip cookies. We lived together for three years and never made a proper meal — and my cookbook was never opened. (October 22, 2010, Page 2B)

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