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Thursday, April 24, 2014

A Sense of Place

30,000 Yankees encamped at College Hill

Stories of courage and honor surround the Yankee’s occupation in the  College Hill area after Gen. Ulysses S. Grant crossed the Tallahatchie River near Abbeville and went on to Oxford.

Grant’s second in command was Gen. William T. Sherman. He had crossed the Tallahatchie at Wyatt’s Crossing, just to the west of Abbeville, and had moved his 30,000 troops into the area around College Hill. (September 10, 2010, Page 3B)

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    The origin of Ole Miss football

    Saturday, Nov. 11, 1893, was the first time an organized football-game was played by students of the University of Mississippi. Oxford EAGLE columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield takes readers back to the scene of that first game coached by Dr. A.L. Bondurant. (September 3, 2010, Page 5B)

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      The story of North Mississippi College

      This week Oxford EAGLE columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield gives readers another lesson Lafayette County Education. Last weeks column he wrote about the formation of a new state university in which the Mississippi Legislature voted for Oxford to be the home site. This week, is about another another institution of higher learning that preceded the University of Mississippi in Lafayette County. (August 27, 2010, Page 2B)

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        James Alexander Ventress: The Father of Ole Miss

        Mississippi House of Representatives member James Alexander Ventress, in early February of 1840, introduced a bill “to provide for the location of the State University.” He was chairman of the house committee on the seminary fund. The House passed the bill on Feb. 10 and then sent it to the state Senate. The Senate quickly passed the bill and sent it on to the Gov. Alexander G. McNutt, for him to sign into law. He signed the bill on Feb. 20, 1840. (August 20, 2010, Page 3B)

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          With the return of the clock, the renovation of the courthouse will be complete

          When I was a child growing up on South Lamar, a little way before you got today’s Highway 6 bypass, I first lived at my grandfather’s home and you could hear the hourly ringing of the town clock while sitting on the front porch. Later on, my mother moved my sisters and I a little closer to the Square on South Lamar just south of where Johnson Avenue comes into South Lamar. The chiming of the clock was even more audible.
          It has been way too long since any of us has heard the clock strike any sort of sound. (August 13, 2010, Page 3B)

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            L.Q.C. Lamar: A Profile in Courage

            In 1955, then-Sen. John F. Kennedy wrote his Pulitzer Prize winning book, “Profiles in Courage,” while recovering from a spinal operation. He had long been interested in statesmen who had shown great political courage in the face of constituent pressures. One of the statesmen he wrote about was Oxford resident Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar. (August 6, 2010, Page 3B)

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              The legend of Toby Tubby lives on

              Oxford EAGLE writer recounts the legend and possible treasure of Chickasaw Chief Toby Tubby. (July 30, 2010, Page 3B)

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                Some doubted the affect Faulkner’s writings would have on Oxford

                Announcement of the awarding of the Nobel Prize for Literature to William Faulkner came on Nov. 10, 1950.
                Under the title “I Know William Faulkner,” his friend, mentor and fellow Oxonian, Phil Stone, wrote in the Nov. 16 issue of the Oxford EAGLE about his lifelong friendship with the now world famous author. Noted New York critic, scholar and translator, Stark Young, also of Oxford, took exception to this statement. (July 23, 2010, Page 3B)

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                  King Gustav Adolf VI of Sweden invited to hunting camp in the Delta

                  This week columnist Jack Mayfield uncovered a letter issued by William Faulkner’s hunting group to King Gustav of Sweden. Read about one of the most interesting stories told about Faulkner and his personal life, found only in this weeks Oxford Living section. (July 16, 2010, Page 3B)

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                    Faulkner’s life-long hunting companion: Sheriff Ike Roberts

                    With the upcoming Faulkner Conference later in July, columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield will focus on the local people and stories that Faulkner befriended. (July 9, 2010, Page 3B)

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