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Wednesday, September 3, 2014

A Sense of Place

Tension runs high among UM students on the eve of war

Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield takes us back to the days before the Civil War broke out when fights among students at the University of Mississippi became more common in the days leading up to the war as tensions began to rise. (January 21, 2011, Page 3B)

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    University students prepare for Civil War

    Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield takes us back to 1861 when a group of University of Mississippi students formed the University Grey who later became Company A of the 11th Mississippi Regiment. (January 14, 2011, Page 3B)

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      Lamar, Isom local delegates to Secession Convention

      Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield writes about when LQ.C. Lamar and Dr. Thomas Dudley Isom were elected to represent Lafayette County in the Secession Convention in 1860 on page 2 B  in today’s Oxford Living section. (January 7, 2011, Page 2B)

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        Remembering Christmases spent on South Lamar

        Jack Mayfield takes us down Memory Lane as he recalls Christmases of the past when he spent the holidays with his grandparents in their South Lamar home. Read about his childhood memories in today’s Oxford Living. (December 23, 2010, Page 3B)

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          Why I look forward to Christmas

          Playing Santa Claus is one of Jack Mayfield’s favorite things to do during the holidays. This week in Oxford Living, the historian takes a break from Oxford’s history to tell us why having a long white beard makes for the perfect Santa Claus. (December 17, 2010, Page 3B)

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            Yankees invade Oxford during Christmas 1862

            Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield writes this week about the invasion of Oxford by Union forces just before Christmas in 1862. (December 10, 2010, Page 2B)

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              At war’s end, Oxford has first Christmas tree

              Columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield talks about Oxford’s first community Christmas tree that was erected at the Memory House on University Avenue. (December 3, 2010, Page 2B)

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                ‘But first we argue’ – Ole Miss-State begins in 1901

                Oxford historian Jack Mayfield takes us back to the beginnings of the Egg Bowl in 1901 when the two teams finally came together for the in-state rivalry that continues today. (November 25, 2010, Page 2B)

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                  Girl Scouts’ Double Decker tour visits Lamar House, UM campus

                  Oxford Living columnist and local historian Jack Lamar Mayfield writes about spending time with a local Girl Scout troop as they tour Oxford and the University of Mississippi on the Double Decker bus. (November 19, 2010, Page 3B)

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                    University trustee Col. James Brown and student malicious mischief

                    We have all read or have heard stories about malicious mischief by college students around the United States. The students of the University of Mississippi have also, over the years, been accused of perpetrating mischief during their years on campus. The following is an event that happened in April of 1852. It concerns one of the first trustees of the Ole Miss, Col. James Brown, and his horse, while it was hitched in front of the Lyceum.

                    First I would like to give you a little background on Col. James Brown. Brown came to Lafayette County in 1836 and was an extensive purchaser of Indian lands in the county. He paid $11,040 for 11 and a half sections of land by 1837. A section of land is 640 acres.

                    This was in the first two years after the Chickasaw lands were opened up for sale by the government. His purchases were widely scattered over the area, but mostly located in those parts of the county where large land purchasers were operating. His holdings were considered extensive for the day as they would be today.

                    Brown being one of the original setters of Lafayette County and one of the wealthiest landowners, was elected to the Board of Trustees of the university in 1846. He was very active in the governance of the university and served as a trustee until 1870, when the Republican legislature reorganized the board. (November 12, 2010, Page 2B)

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