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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

A Sense of Place

The Grove: ‘The loveliest landscape in the state’

Historian and columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield takes us back to the days when real tailgating went on in The Grove — when cars parked on the grass and food and drinks were stuffed into the trunks. Read about how The Grove kept Ole Miss in Oxford in today’s Oxford Living. (April 15, 2011, Page 2B)

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    The Downtown Grill passes into the history of Oxford

    Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield pays tribute to the Downtown Grill, which is closing this weekend after 22 years in Oxford. (April 8, 2011, Page 2B)

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      Veterans gives reasons why South failed

      Historian and columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield continues this week with sharing with us the thoughts of Civil War veteran Thomas P. Buford as to why the South lost the “War between the States.” (April 1, 2011, Page 2B)

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        Local veteran lists cause of war

        Columnist and historian Jack Lamar Mayfield shows us the Civil War through the words of one who was there. (March 25, 2011, Page 2B)

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          The banner presentation to the Lamar Rifles

          Columnist and historian Jack Lamar Mayfield tells about the banner that seven young ladies presented to The Lamar Rifles in 1861. The bright banner was made on white silk and was 8 feet long. (March 18, 2011, Page 2B)

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            Young ladies of Oxford honor the Lamar Rifles

            Columnist and historian Jack Lamar Mayfield spends time this week taking us back 150 years ago when a grand parade was held to welcome the Jeff Davis Rifles. (March 11, 2011, Page 3B)

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              The Lafayette Guards are first to go off to war

              Historian Jack Lamar Mayfield tells us about the first unit to leave Oxdford to fight in the Civil War . The Lamar Guard was formed in 1860. They left Oxford in 1861 where they would fight in Pensacola, Fla. and in North Carolina. (March 4, 2011, Page 2B)

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                The Lamar Rifles: Company G, 11th Mississippi Regiment

                Columnist and local historian Jack Lamar Mayfield tells us more about the The Lamar Rifles this week — the group of Lafayette County men who made were one of the first local volunteer units to organize. The unit was named after L.Q.C. Lamar. Read more about the brave men who made up this unit in today’s Oxford Living. (February 25, 2011, Page 3B)

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                  War preparations by the citizens of Oxford/Lafayette

                  Jack Lamar Mayfield brings us back in time to the months leading up to the departure of local troops to the front lines of the Civil War in this week’s A Sense of Place column. Read about the University Greys and Lamar Rifles and those who helped fund their weapons and uniforms in today’s Oxford Living. (February 18, 2011, Page 3B)

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                    Oxford, Ole Miss in 1893: The year ‘Big Todd’ Wade was hung

                    Historian and local columnist Jack Lamar Mayfield tells is what was going on around Oxford in 1893, the year the community film, “The Hanging of Big Todd Wade,” is set in. The movie premiers Saturday at the Oxford Film Festival. Mayfield has a part in the film. (February 11, 2011, Page 3B)

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