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Monday, July 28, 2014

Alyssa Schnugg

Cut trees along path concerns walker

In December, trees were cut down by a contractor through North East Mississippi Electrical Power Association in December to clear them away from low-hanging power lines. The trees and branches have been left behind haphazardly along the walking and bike paths that are part of the Oxford Pathways project. (March 10, 2011, Page 2)

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    Little Tallahatchie River threatens to spill over due to heavy rains

    The rain stopped just in time to prevent the Little Tallahatchie River at Etta from overflowing. At 9 p.m. Wednesday, the river crested at 25.3 feet. Flood level is 25 feet. (March 10, 2011, Page 8)

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      Georgia church pays tribute to late Oxford man at ceremony

      On Feb. 27, the Union Baptist Church of Buford, Ga. concluded its month-long celebration of Black History Month with a tribute to the late Leonard Thompson who died June 22, 2010 after going into anaphylactic shock from a wasp sting. (March 9, 2011, Page 2)

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        Scruggs presses case to regain law license

        A U.S. District judge has given prosecutors until Friday to complete depositions of several people involved with a judicial bribery case that involved Zach Scruggs, who is attempting to vacate his conviction and sentence and regain his license to practice law. (March 9, 2011, Page 1)

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          County voices concerns over hospital

          At their regular meeting Monday, Lafayette County Board of Supervisors say they’re concerned about the hospital possibly building its new $300-million regional referral medical center west of Oxford off Highway 6. However the county attorney warned them to not get involved in any promoting any particular place to put the new facility. (March 8, 2011, Page 1)

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            Too far away for comfort?

            Assisted living facilities for seniors, veterans and persons with development disabilities in Lafayette County were all built where they are today largely because of their close proximity to where Baptist Memorial Hospital-North Mississippi is currently located.

            But now, with Baptist officials planning on moving the hospital, officials from those facilities are concerned about the possible impact the move might have on their residents — particularly if the site selected for the new $300 million facility will be where Baptist affiliates recently purchased 107 acres off Highway 6 West, about seven miles away from where the hospital is currently. (March 8, 2011, Page 1)

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              ICM could get county help

              The Lafayette County Board of Supervisors discussed several topics at their regular meeting on Monday at the Lafayette County Chancery Building that included getting help for Interfaith Compassion Ministry through legislation; receiving a bus stretcher conversion kits to help transport several people at one time during a catastrophic event, and an update on the Winchester Centerfire plant. (March 8, 2011, Page 5)

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                Smelly situation stinks up Brittany Woods

                Officials believe illegal dumping into a waste water treatment plant in front of the Brittany Woods subdivision might have caused the horrible spell plaguing residents in the last week or two. (March 7, 2011, Page 1A)

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                  Keeping mind, bodies healthy through dance

                  Seniors get down, turn around and go to town while doing some “boot scootin’ boogie” during the RSVP line dancing class offered for free to those 55 years old and up at the Oxford Activity Center. See today’s Oxford Living. (March 4, 2011, Page 1B)

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                    Angel Ranch changes direction

                    Since Feb. 1, Angel Ranch has been providing long-term care to six females, 14 to 21 years old, who were the victims of domestic violence. This marks a change in the type of person the nonprofit agency has been providing its services. Since it began in 2006, Angel Ranch had been serving younger children by providing an emergency shelter for children who were victims of child abuse and neglect. (March 4, 2011, Page 1A)

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