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Thursday, October 2, 2014

County Briefs

Burn ban still in effect

The Lafayette County Board of Supervisors voted Monday to extend the county’s burn ban until its next meeting in December at the request of Lafayette County Fire Coordinator Jerry Johnson.

Last month, Gov. Haley Barbour issued a state-wide burn ban which supersedes the county’s. However, Johnson said if the governor decided to remove the ban, he felt the county was still too dry to remove its ban.

The National Weather Service forecasts rain today through Wednesday. The board granted Johnson the ability to rescind the ban on the recommendation of the Mississippi Forestry Commission if conditions improve before the next board meeting.

The board also voted to allow the Lafayette County Volunteer Fire Department to advertise for bids on a new storage facility at Johnson’s request.

Sheriff’s Department new computers

The board voted to approve the purchase of six laptops of the Lafayette County Sheriff’s Department that will be placed inside patrol vehicles. It will also allow deputies to be connected to the CAD system and the LCSD record system.

The county received a $65,000 grant from the Department of Public Safety for the purchase of the equipment for the software and the laptops.

Homeland security grants

The board voted to allow Tisaby & Associates to assess the county’s fire department, sheriff’s department and EMS services to see if any or all would be entitled to federal grants from the Department of Homeland Security. The company would not be paid by the county but would receive grant administration fees from the government.

Hospital move

The Board of Supervisors met with the Oxford Board of Aldermen in executive session after the board’s regular meeting Monday to discuss the future of Baptist Memorial Hospital-North Mississippi.

In August 2009, Baptist announced its plans to replace the current hospital with a new $300 million regional referral center. The corporation is requesting to purchase the existing facility and buy its way out of a lease with the city and county, which currently own the hospital. That lease isn’t set to expire until 2034.

The new facility is expected to cost about $300 million and will provide a comprehensive, state-of-the-art environment that will accommodate future health care technology.

The two boards agreed to meet again at 10 a.m. Nov. 19 in executive session, which means the meeting is closed to the public.

No other action was taken. (November 2, 2010, Page 2)

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